This Week in Concord – Cannabis Legalization, NH Independence

The author is a New Hampshire state representative committed to advancing the cause of liberty

This week there are a number of bills scheduled for their public hearings that affect many Granite Staters. All of the hearings on these bills are open to the public but the hearings on these bills this week will be the only chance for members of the public to give testimony until the bills crossover to the Senate. I strongly recommend attending any of these committee hearings if you are able. [Read more…]

This Week in Concord – New Hampshire Legislative Review

The author is a New Hampshire state representative committed to advancing the cause of liberty

This week there are a number of bills scheduled for their public hearings that affect many Granite Staters. All of the hearings on these bills are open to the public but the hearings on these bills this week will be the only chance for members of the public to give testimony until the bills crossover to the Senate. I strongly recommend attending any of these committee hearings if you are able. [Read more…]

The Battle of Katahdin: Maine vs. the Feds

katahdin

For the last several months there has been a quiet battle raging over the fate of thousands of acres of land in Maine’s north woods. Roxanne Quimby, one of the co-founders of Burt’s Bees and a prominent philanthropist, had for years been buying lands surrounding Baxter State Park; home to Maine’s highest peak Mount Katahdin. Mrs. Quimby was rumored to have been buying the lands with the goal of creating a conservation zone. Obviously questions have been raised as to whether or not the goal is to incorporate the land into the existing Baxter lands or something else. Last month it was confirmed that Mrs. Quimby has other plans which could have very devastating consequences for Maine’s north woods.

Many Mainers are of course skeptical of the creation of such a zone. What will the rules governing this conservation zone be? Will hunting, fishing, snowmobiling, and other popular recreational activities be permitted? Will the land be managed by the State of Maine or will it fall into federal hands? Paul LePage, the Governor of Maine, was a strong voice of opposition to Mrs. Quimby’s rather ambiguous plans, suggesting that the lands would likely not go to the state but rather to the federal government. As the Governor and other critics have noted, some of the lands Mrs. Quimby has purchased in the Moosehead and Katahdin regions have been restricted to many recreational activities which is similar to the sort of federal restrictions on National Park land. Elliotsville Plantation LLC., Quimby’s holding company for the lands, had for months refused to issue statement on the future liberalization of the rules for use of the land. [Read more…]

Examining the NH Primary Election Results

chris_sununu

Back in August we conducted a poll of likely New Hampshire primary voters for the gubernatorial races. Instead of polling by phone we targeted our subjects via social media by scrutinizing their activity in politically oriented Facebook groups or their Twitter activity. This polling method has been essentially written off as biased towards those people who own and frequently make use of computers or smartphones. However, in an age where the rate of ownership and use of these devices is ever rising does it not make sense that our methods of polling should reflect these changes? The New Hampshire state primaries were held last week on September 13th and the results surprised quite a few party insiders who severely underestimated the support of supposedly lesser-known candidates. So the question is: how accurate were the results of our polling method compared to how people actually voted? [Read more…]

Brazil’s Big Mistake: The Rio Games

rio

A few weeks back the Olympic Games kicked off in Rio de Janeiro. Thousands of athletes from around the world came for two weeks to compete in all different sorts of events. Along with these athletes were legions of coaches, assistants, trainers, judges, referees, translators, journalists, and tourists. Over the course of the games tens (if not hundreds) of millions of dollars were spent, giving a significant boost the the local economy. However, Brazil may not be in a position to handle this temporary boom.

Over the past several years the Brazilian economy has been propped up by government spending. Much of this spending is linked either directly or indirectly to public works projects associated with the 2014 FIFA World Cup or the 2016 Olympic Games. Projects such as stadiums, sports facilities, housing, and other infrastructure improvements. The common thread of all this spending is that the assets purchased had very limited life. And unfortunately for the people of Brazil, when the Olympic torch was extinguished that life ended.

Hosting the Olympic Games has always been a costly endeavor and the vast majority of countries cannot actually afford it. In the past countries found thrifty ways to recycle the facilities they paid for with public funds, thereby getting the most bang for their buck. West Germany turned the facilities at Munich into a public park and it has since been used as a venue for concerts, sporting events, and festivals. Even recently, the British government converted the 2012 London Olympic Stadium into a football pitch. [Read more…]

An Alternate Look at the NH Governor’s Race

edelblut

With only a month left until the New Hampshire state primaries, the gubernatorial race is heating up on both sides. Major news outlets in the state have released several polls showing the Republican races to be narrowing to just two candidates: Chris Sununu and Ted Gatsas. On the Democratic side, the race is reportedly between Colin Van Ostern and Mark Connolly.

However, just how accurate are these polls? Are they really representative of the likely primary voters in the state? To answer that question, we covertly ran a poll that was selectively and anonymously released to groups of people, both Democrats and Republicans, who were identified as high probability primary voters. We found a significant difference between the major polls and our own. This poll had a sample size of 201 to represent the ~1,327,000 residents of the state. We omitted responses that did not provide an area code to substantiate residence. The following data was collected between 8/3/16 and 8/12/16 at a confidence level of 95% with a margin of error of (+/- 6.9%): [Read more…]